Quarndon Plants and Flowers

This page shows 2022 plant and flower updates. If you wish to see earlier notifications please contact web@quarndon-pc.gov.uk

Blooming Quarndon

Update 8th March 2022
Blooming Quarndon 2022 - Donations appreciated!

It is planned to have a summer display of flowers in Quarndon again in 2022. This year will be a little different because changes to the arrangements for annual structural testing, required by Derbyshire County Council, of all lampposts used to attach flower baskets have made it unaffordable to continue with any streetlamp mounted displays. Instead, we will be focusing of ground-based planters and baskets mounted where structural testing is not required. Full detail of what is proposed is included in the PDF Flyer below.

We need donations please by the end of March to fund the planned displays.

If you would like to see floral displays around Quarndon again in 2022,

please make a contribution.

Wild flowers

Wild Flower Update, 27th March 2022

Preparing Montpelier roundabout for wildflower seeds

Preparing Montpelier roundabout for planting of wildflower seeds, March 2022.

Wild Flower Update, 17th March 2022

Bee on flower, with unusual blue pollen

Jubilee Wildflower Seeds

This seed mixture offers a welcome opportunity to deck gardens for the Jubilee and provide a welcome food source for bees, butterflies and other pollinators.

The species included in this mixture create an attractive display from May to October and is suitable for creating habitats across a diverse range of soil types. It is ideal for use in areas containing a range of micro climates or where there are no particular conditions to overcome.

The seeds are on sale at the Repair Cafe at the Village Hall from 10am to 12pm on Saturday 26th March.

  • £1 per m2
  • A mix of native and non-native wildflower species
  • perfect for pollinators
  • in shades of red, white and blue
  • sold in aid of Quarndon in Bloom

Bee-friendly flowers - Rosybee study

This fascinating survey gives helpful information about which plants are most bee-friendly, and what to plant to attract lots of pollinators.
The number of bees each plant attracts varies hugely, so this research helps anyone wanting to provide a helpful stopover for bees.
Bees get their food where they can. They don't mind what plant they feed on - both native and non-native plants - bring 'em on!

A variety of healthy plants will attract a wide range of bees.

Click on the link below for the survey, and have a look at Rosybees' home page, too, for more about helping our wonderful bees.

https://www.rosybee.com/research-study

Bee and butterfly identification guides and gardening for pollinators

Hairy legs, smelly feet, a white, buff or ginger tail, royalty… Early bees are already busy pollinating your garden.

The downloadable Garden Bees ID Guide below can help you to identify these early visitors.

And look closely at the wildflower areas already coming into leaf around the village, to see which bees you can spot.

Check out these links too to find out about adding more bee and wildlife-friendly plants to your garden.

And the smelly feet? Bees mark a flower already stripped of pollen and nectar with an oily substance, found on their body and feet. It signals to other bee visitors that they should try somewhere else for their delicious nectar.

The bees on the identification download are not to scale.

See there Butterfly Conservation site below for butterfly identification chart, and Royal Horticultural Society's site for helpful information on making your garden welcoming for pollinators.

https://www.bumblebeeconservation.org

https://www.bbka.org.uk. (British Beekeepers Association)

https://butterfly-conservation.org

https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/wildlife-garden/wildlife (Royal Horticultural Society)

Click on the link below to download an illustrated information sheet about Montpelier's wild flowers.